City of Milton Passes Tree Ordinance Resolution

On May 6 the Milton City Council gave a nod to a future revision of the current Tree Conservation Ordinance.

When the City of Milton incorporated in late 2006, it adopted the Fulton County Tree Conservation Ordinance which was used in the area prior to the City's formation. Now, as the new city is maturing, council has approved a resolution to establish a citizens' participation group to revise or create a new Milton Tree Preservation Ordinance. The city of Sandy Springs, incorporated a year prior to Milton, successfully implemented a whole new ordinance in early 2007.

When a community decides to adopt a new or revised tree ordinance in Georgia, the creation of a citizen's participation group or task force is a common procedure in Georgia.

Comments

MikeB said…
I pity the fool responsible for that task.
nonot said…
I came across the following article and wonder if the City of Pittsburgh had a Tree Ordinance Resolution similar to the City of Milton or Sandy Springs, could this event have occurred?

From thepittsburghchannel.com.

Group Protests Cutting Down Of Schenley Golf Course Trees Tue, 3 Jun 2008 18:14:09 EDT

PITTSBURGH -- Pittsburgh officials said several decades-old trees that are marked to be cut down inside Schenley Park at the Bob O'Connor Golf Course are diseased, but a local environmental group claims not all of them are.

The environmental group Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest claims eight healthy oak trees averaging 90 years old are among those being cut down in the golf course to accommodate golfers.

"There are such limited resources and such a great backlog of tree removals around the city, trees that pose an immediate threat to the public," said Danielle Crumrine of Friends of Pittsburgh. "Why is the city removing trees to benefit the golf course?"

The nonprofit group raises money to help fund the city's plan to remove sick trees across city neighborhoods.

The nonprofit group First-Tee manages the golf course.

"While playability was certainly one of the factors that went into the mix, this was a collaboration by the city forester, Public Works, city parks, a USGA agronomist, the approved city tree vendor, as well as our staff," said Marc Field of Fires-Tee.

Information was not immediately available on whether the cost of removing the trees would be absorbed by the company that manages the golf course for the city or whether it would be passed on to city taxpayers.

Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's office said the city plans to plant 55 new trees in Schenley Park.

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